Useful Questions for Interacting with your Character

How you want to build your character’s backstory, and the degree to which you build it, is up to you. The idea is the more characterization you build in, the easier it is for me to have the story do interesting things with that character. Given that the campaign is ideally about telling stories about characters, it is going to focus on the characters that are closer to the “realized character” end of the spectrum than the “expression of rules mechanics” end of the spectrum. If you are stuck on ways to develop your character, let me know or bring it up in game. Coming up with ideas for character development can be a lot of fun.

Having said that, your characters are all going to have to be co-existing, and it would be helpful to let the other players know what will work best in interacting with your character. So, bearing in mind that your characters are all old friends with a minimum of social competence and tolerance for interpersonal communication, here are a few questions to smooth that process:

  • How does your character want others to interact with him/her?
    This is your character’s ideal preference for interaction. If your character prefers reserved conversation, maybe your friend who’s more of a raunchy loudmouth tones it down around him/her. If your character is the gregarious extrovert, maybe the socially timid character makes an effort to accompany his/her friend to a public event on occasion.
  • How much of a ‘sense of humor’ does your character have?
    In other words, when does it stop being funny for him/her? Can the character stand being the butt of a joke? A victim of pranks? It’s not about the jokes your character likes to tell or play, it’s about what his/her friends know would be interpreted as mean rather than funny.
  • What are the quirks and hot buttons for your character?
    Everyone has a sensitive topic or two they’d like others to avoid, or a personal quirk/weakness their friends accommodate. What are your character’s sensitive spots? The goal here isn’t to make other characters or players walk on eggshells, but to allow everyone to play their character without feeling like they have to understate their characterization in order to allow the group to stay together.
  • What’s the final line for your character?
    Obviously as old-friends, your characters are willing to look past each other’s minor foibles. But even the best of friends have standards. How badly can your friends behave and still be your friends? Victimizing mortals? Casually breaking promises? If you know something is going to be a big deal to another character, it’s a moment where we step out of character and talk about whether it’s really that important to the character to take that action, and if so how to make it work within the party.

Useful Questions for Interacting with your Character

The Ameth Chronicle ADP ADP